Essential information on hunting in Namibia

The Namibian Trophy Hunting season opens on February 1 and closes on November 30 of each year. Clients should ensure that they are booked and will be hunting with a registered Namibian operator, as well as a registered Namibian hunting professional.
 

The three classifications of hunting professionals are:

  • Hunting guides
  • Master hunting guides
  • Professional hunters

Two specialist qualifications are:

  • Big Game Professional Hunters – registered Namibian professional hunter who has passed the Big Game examination;
  • Bow Hunting Professional Hunters – registered Namibian hunting professional with an additional bow-hunting qualification.

Hunting professionals should comply with all the Ministry of Environment & Tourism’s (MEFT’s) trophy-hunting regulations.

  • Trophy hunting may be practiced from half an hour before sunrise, until half an hour after sunset.
  • Trophy hunting may take place only on properties where permission has been granted by the landowner.
  • Properties, where bow hunting is practiced, must be registered additionally with MEFT for bow hunting.

The following is required regarding permits for trophy hunting:

  • Permits must be issued prior to the hunt commencing;
  • A separate permit must be issued for each individual hunting client;
  • An extra, special permit is required for large cats (leopard, cheetah, lion).
  • It contains an additional list of conditions;
  • A permit must be completed in full by the hunting client and the hunting professional (wounded or lost animals must also be indicated on the permit);
  • Permits are issued by the MEFT only; and
  • A maximum of two trophies per species may be harvested, per hunting client, per permit.
  • All trophy-hunting operators must be registered with the Namibia Tourism Board (NTB).
  • Hunting with dogs is not permitted.

Requirements for importing firearms

Refer to the Namibian Professional Hunting Association (NAPHA) website for the required minimum muzzle velocities for firearms for various game species. A maximum of one hundred (100) rounds of ammunition may be imported per hunting rifle. Only ammunition for the specific caliber may be imported. It is legal to hunt with black powder rifles in Namibia. (Refer to this website for the black-powder hunting regulations.). It is illegal to transport black powder and percussion caps. These can be purchased in Namibia. Inquire with your trophy-hunting operator. It is legal to import bows for bow-hunting purposes. No import permit is required. (Refer to this website for the Bow Hunting requirements.).

Payment

  • A detailed Tax Invoice must be issued for every hunt;
  • Value-added tax (VAT) is currently 15% and must be paid on services and trophies that are not exported by the hunting operator on behalf of the client. (The VAT on trophies to be exported by the operator if accompanied by a copy of the passport of the client, the completed hunting permit, and a copy of the invoice for the hunt is zero %.);
  • Please enquire what means of payment is required by your operator;
  • VAT is applicable on wounded game not recovered.

Prohibited Practices

It is illegal to hunt for trophies:

  • at night and/or with artificial light;
  • that do not qualify in terms of the minimum measurement requirements as specified by the MEFT, Namibian Quality Control. If trophies do not meet this requirement, they do not have to be paid for. Exceptions are trophies with abnormalities and age deformities, which are taken home by the client, (Refer to the NAPHA Medal Brochure for minimum measurements.); and
  • in contravention of the Fair Chase principles as stated in the NAPHA Code of Conduct.

The immediate export of trophies from Namibia is possible only with a veterinary certificate, an export permit from the MEFT, and the import permit as required by the country of the final destination.

Prohibited firearms are currently

  • All handguns
  • All automatic firearms
  • All crossbows

Recommended NAPHA Guidelines

Book and hunt only with a NAPHA member and an operator who can prove that he is registered with the Namibian Tourism Board. Consult the annual Huntinamibia magazine or refer to this website for a complete membership list.
It is highly recommended that you enter into a written and signed pre-hunt agreement/ contract mutually agreed upon with your trophy-hunting operator or agent.

It is recommended that you request to see your trophy-hunting permit prior to commencing your hunt. If no permit has been issued, your trophy export will be jeopardized. All trophies taken must be checked and signed by the hunting client and the hunting professional on the trophy-hunting permit on completion of the hunt. There is no limit to the number of firearms that may be imported into Namibia for trophy-hunting purposes.

  • NAPHA, however, recommends a maximum of two firearms per hunting client;
  • If traveling through South Africa, keep in mind that immigration control there clears a maximum of two firearms for import;
  • Any unconventional firearm to be imported for trophy-hunting purposes is to be applied for to the Inspector General before arrival;
  • It is suggested that you bring between sixty and eighty rounds of ammunition per hunting rifle.

Traveling with firearms to Namibia

Take out full insurance for all firearms before traveling anywhere in Africa. NAPHA recommends flying directly to Namibia from Europe into Hosea Kutako International Airport near Windhoek. This will minimize delays associated with firearm transport.
Recent regulations have made traveling with firearms a time-consuming process when entering South Africa. Make sure that you stay in transit with your luggage. It is suggested that you adhere to the following procedure to minimize problems when traveling with firearms:

  • All bags need to be adequately marked with nametags for identification;
  • Pack an unloaded rifle in a sturdy carry case;
  • Have a separate lockable container in which to store your ammunition separate from your rifle in your checked luggage;
  • At the check-in counter at the point of departure, insist that the agent check your firearm through to Hosea Kutako International Airport, Windhoek. Your bag tag should read, for example, New York – Frankfurt – Windhoek OR Atlanta – Johannesburg – Windhoek. (This is sometimes not possible if the airlines that you are using do not have baggage agreements. Inquire about this before purchasing your ticket.);
  • Windhoek Airport’s International baggage code is WDH; and
  • Physically check baggage tag to ensure that it has been correctly printed and attached. Inquire if a colorful ‘in transit tag’ is necessary when traveling through another country.

Should you have any reason to be dissatisfied while hunting in Namibia with a NAPHA member, please inform the NAPHA office, in writing, with the full details of your complaint at info(at)napha.com.na.

For any further information or current updates on hunting in Namibia please refer to this website.

Visa Requirements

All visitors to Namibia must be in possession of a valid passport. Temporary residence permits for visitors are issued on arrival and allow tourists a period of 90 days per year in the country.

Bona fide tourists and business travelers of the following countries are exempted from visa requirements: Angola, Austria, Belgium, Botswana, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Lichtenstein, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Mozambique, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Tanzania, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zimbabwe.

Visitors are, however, advised to confirm visa requirements with their travel agent.

Legal Information

The Namibian Trophy Hunting season opens on February 1 and closes on November 30 of each year. Clients should ensure that they are booked and will be hunting with a registered Namibian operator, as well as a registered Namibian hunting professional.

Ethical Marketing Practices for Hunters

The Posting of Hunting Photographs on Social Media

In today’s modern world of instant communication and distribution of photographs and other images, life has become a lot easier when it comes to the sharing of experiences. At the click of a button the entire world can share the wonderful scenery and wildlife that is so abundant in our beautiful country.

Unfortunately, there is a downside to social media and the reaction that images can provoke. When sharing photos, you potentially share images with the world and, as with any society, these images will be viewed with differing reactions and opinions. This is especially true of Conservation Hunting where a great portion of the world’s population is unaware of the benefits that such selective hunting offers to conservation at large. Hunting is often misunderstood and therefore the un- or misinformed public can easily be swayed and influenced. Hunting images can be viewed as controversial and, as a result thereof, elicit a negative reaction from the viewer. It is for this reason that the hunting professional and his or her client must, AT ALL TIMES, be cognizant of the potential reaction that any images might cause and consider this whenever posting on social media.

 
Namibia cannot afford any opposition to hunting, as it is dependent on responsible
hunting for continued conservation through sustainable use, as per Namibia’s

Constitution.

This brochure has thus been published with the above consideration in mind, in order to both protect the hunting professional and hunter, as well as to inform and educate the general public as to the benefits derived from Conservation Hunting, both in terms of conservation, as well as the benefits to the Namibian society.

Hon. Pohamba Shifeta
Minister of Environment and Tourism

Hunting Laws & Rifle Importation

 
The trophy hunting season stretches from 1st February to 30th November. During December and January, the hunting season is closed to trophy hunting. February may still fall within the rainy season and November may still be too hot.
 

Hunting Guides

Hunting shall be conducted exclusively in the company of a registered hunting guide, master hunting guide, or professional hunter.

Hunting Guides (HG) may only conduct hunts on their own farm(s), duly registered as a hunting farm(s).

Master Hunting Guides (MHG) may only conduct hunts on their own farm(s) duly registered, plus two additional duly registered hunting farms.

Professional Hunters (PH) may conduct hunts on all farms, provided they have written permission from the owner of the property independent of whether the farm is registered or not.

PH with Big-Game license – only these PHs may conduct hunts with guests for elephants, rhinoceros, buffalo, and lions.

Bow Hunting – only hunting guides/ master hunting guides/ professional hunters in possession of a valid bow hunting license may conduct bow hunting and guide bow hunters.

Hunting permits

A hunt shall only commence if the HG / MHG / PH has obtained a valid hunting permit (trophy hunting permit) from Nature Conservation prior to the start of the hunt. For cheetah and leopard an additional hunting permit has to be obtained prior to the start of the hunt.

Wing shooting

A hunter may take no more than two members of the permitted bird species during the hunt, which will be listed in the trophy permit. During the official “wing shooting season” more of each species is allowed.

Hunting clients

A hunting guide, master hunting guide or professional hunter shall accompany only two hunters to hunt simultaneously.

Firearms

Firearms

As per the Nature Conservation Ordinance No 4 of 1975:

No person shall use a revolver, pistol, or automatic firearm when hunting game or use a firearm of which the bullet has energy at the muzzle of the barrel which is lower than the following when hunting a species of the game indicated there under:

Small Game:
(e.g. Dik-Dik; Steenbok; Duiker; Springbok)
Minimum caliber: .243 (or equivalent caliber in mm)
Energy: 1350 Joule

Medium Game:
(e.g. Hartebeest; Oryx; Wildebeest; Kudu; Eland and all exotic species)
Minimum caliber: .270 (or equivalent caliber in mm)
Energy: 2700 Joule

Dangerous Game:
(e.g. Elephant; Hippo; Rhino; Buffalo; Lion)
Minimum caliber: .375 (or equivalent caliber in mm)
Energy: 5400 Joule

No solid point cartridge is allowed to be used as per the Nature Conservation Ordinance No 4 of 1975 on any other species than pachyderms (Elephant, Hippo, Rhino).

Handguns, Automatic and Semi-automatic weapons are prohibited in Namibia for trophy hunting purposes.

Hunters visiting Namibia may import 60 cartridges per caliber.

The below table is a recommendation, keeping the minimum energy requirements in mind. Table 1: Bullet Efficiency Index  Small Game, Medium Game,  Large Game &  Heavy Game

Caliber   Bullet weight Momentum   Cross-Sectional Area   Sectional Density Joule E0 Bullet Efficiency Index Max Game weight
17 Rem 25grs 2.0 14.64 .121 1280 4 13 kg
223 Rem 55 grs 3.53 24.28 .158 1738 14 46 kg
243 100grs 6.07 28.27 .242 2845 42 138 kg
7×57 150grs 6.72 38.48 .266 2700 73 240 kg
7×57 175grs 8.63 38.48 .310 3237 103 340 kg
7mm Rem Mag 175 grs 9.85 38.48 .310 4762 117 386 kg
30-06 180 grs 9.82 45.6 .271 4128 115 380 kg
30-06 220 grs 10.46 45.6 .331 4160 148 488 kg
300 Win Mag 180 grs 10.30 45.6 .271 4516 127 419 kg
300 Win Mag 220 grs 11.68 45.6 .331 4773 176 528 kg
300 Weatherby 150 grs 10.66 45.6 .226 5349 110 363 kg
30-378 Weatherby 180 grs 12.08 45.6 .271 5479 149 491 kg
8 x 68S 180 grs 11.58 50.26 .246 5735 144 475 kg
8 x 68S 224 grs 12.62 50.26 .307 5484 195 643 kg
338 JH Exp 250 grs 12.64 56.74 .313 4928 222 732 kg
338 Win Mag 225 grs 12.39 56.74 .281 5237 200 660 kg
338 Win Mag 250 grs 13.15 56.74 .313 5314 233 769 kg
35 Whelen 250 grs 11.84 63.62 .279 4334 209 689 kg
358 Norma Magnum 250 grs 13.93 63.62 .279 5990 245 809 kg
9,3×62 293 grs 14.06 67.93 .312 5199 298 983 kg SP* 2622 kg FJ**
9,3×64 293 grs 14.91 67.93 .312 5857 316 1042 kg SP 2780 kg FJ
375 H&H 270 grs 14.35 70.88 .274 5884 279 920 kg SP 2455 kg FJ
375 H& H 300 grs 14.98 70.88 .305 6054 324 1069 kg SP 2851 Kg FJ
378 Weatherby 300 grs 17.34 70.88 .305 7734 375 1237 kg SP 5625 kg FJ
416 Rem Mag 400 grs 18.84 86.59 .330 6697 548 1808 kg SP 4822 kg FJ
10.75×68 350 grs 14.88 90.66 .279 4898 376 1240 kg SP 3308 kg FJ
404 Jeffery 400 grs 17.63 90.66 .319 5993 510 1638 kg SP 4488 kg FJ
458 Win Mag 500 grs 19.63 105.68 .341 5950 739 2438 kg SP 6503 kg FJ
460 Weatherby 500 grs 26.67 105.68 .341 10973 966 3188 kg SP 8500 kg FJ
470 N Exp 500 grs 21.22 111.22 .317 6951 748 2468 kg SP 6582 kg FJ
500 NE 510 grs 21.48 129.22 .280 7087 777 2564 kg SP 6873 kg FJ
500 Jeffrey 510 grs 23.33 129.22 .280 8455 827 2729 kg SP 7278 kg FJ
505 Gibbs 525 grs 23.98 126.67 .295 8616 914 3016 kg SP 8043 kg FJ
577 N Exp 750 grs 29.65 167.41 .314 9043 1558 5142 kg SP 13710 kg FJ
600 N Exp 900 grs 34.7 182.41 .334 10324 2114 6976 kg SP 18603 kg FJ

*SP = Soft Point         **FJ = Full Jacket Alphin, A,B. (ed). (1996) Any Shot you want. The A-Square Handloading and Rifle Manual. USA: On Target Press. Hoffmann, J. (2013) Minimale Energiewerte für Jagdpatronen in Namibia. Erongo Verzeichnis für afrikansiches Jagdwild: 1/13.

Bow hunting

Namibia has a long tradition of hunting with a bow and arrow. Practiced by various rural communities; the most well-known of these is the Kalahari Bushmen, who traditionally hunt with poisoned arrows. Bow-hunting for trophies in its modern form was legalized in 1997 and is thus a recent development.

The predominant drive behind this development was the ever-growing trophy hunting sector. Modern-day trophy hunters, who would like to hunt in Namibia with a bow, can select from a large variety of registered Bow-hunting outfitters. Due to Namibia’s natural habitat, types of game and seasonal changes in vegetation, bow hunting requires the highest standard of hunting skills and ethical behavior.

EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Long Bow – being a straight, one-piece or take-down bow  
  • Recurve Bow – being a bow with curved tipped limbs which bend away from the archer when the bow is held in the shooting position 
  • Compound Bow – being a bow that uses a cable and pulleys to increase its power or the velocity of the arrow shot from it, by means of the storing of energy
  • Cross Bow – Illegal in Namibia

HUNTING TECHNIQUES:
Bow-hunting in Namibia is practiced using a number of techniques. Hunters may lie in ambush in areas frequented by game, or they may stalk their prey.

BLINDS:
Bow hunting from blinds is preferred during the Namibian winter months, June until August, and the drier months September and October. The majority of hunting takes place from permanently constructed blinds i.e. ground blinds, tree blinds, and temporary pop-up blinds on game trails. Animals have to be within 20 m -30 m from waterholes and salt lick stations, relaxed and unaware of the hunter. Normally only “side-on” shots are taken.

SPOT AND STALKING:
This method is preferred during the green season months, February until May as sufficient cover exists and the green bush is softer on the foot and reduces noise while stalking. Spot and stalk hunting is also used for the “more difficult” game species or those that do not frequent waterholes. Due to the difficulty of achieving the above criteria, bow-hunting in Namibia is technically a highly selective sport and requires above-normal self-discipline and physical fitness. Surrounding game species are disturbed very little and are often not even aware of the hunt that is taking place.

ARROWS:
Arrows can be made out of

  • Wood, fiberglass, carbon or carbon compounds, and aluminum   
  • The shaft must have a minimum length of 19.68 inches (500 mm)

BROADHEADS:
Broadheads must

  • Consist of at least two fixed cutting blades    
  • A minimum cutting edge length and width of 1 inch (26 mm+) 


Broadheads may not

  • Have barbed or serrated edges
  • Contain poison or narcotics 


Mechanical broadheads are legal in Namibia. Special arrow points such as judo points, bird points, or blunt points may be used for the bow hunting of game bird species only, a hunter may take no more than two members of the permitted bird species during the hunt, which will be listed in the trophy permit.

PLAINS GAME:
Namibia offers a large variety of plains game species for trophy hunting. These include the following with the minimum Bow energy restrictions:

Small game
Rock-rabbit (hyrax), Rabbits, Porcupine, African Wildcat, Caracal, Black-backed Jackal, Damara Dik-Dik, Steenbok, Duiker, Klipspringer, Springbok, Letchwe, Blesbok, Bontebok, Bushbuck, and huntable game birds.
Energy less than 33.9 joules (25ft/lbs)
Weight less than 22.68 gram (350 grain)

Medium game
Chakma Baboon, Warthog, Black-face, and Southern Impala, Nyala, Spotted Hyena, and Cheetah
Energy less than 54.24 joules (40 ft/lbs)
Weight less than 25.92 grams (400 grain)

Large game
Gemsbok/ Oryx, Kudu, Red Hartebeest, Roan antelope, Sable antelope, Tsessebe, Waterbuck, Blue, and Black Wildebeest, Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra and Burchell’s plains Zebra, Cape Eland and Giraffe.
Energy less than 88.13 joules (65 ft/lbs)
Weight less than 29.16 gram (450 grain)

DANGEROUS GAME:
The following Dangerous Game species CAN NOT be hunted in Namibia with the Bow:
Elephant, Hippopotamus, Crocodile, Buffalo, Lion, Leopard

It is illegal to hunt any of the above-mentioned Dangerous Game species with the bow and export the trophy on a Special (Rifle) permit from MEFT, Ministry of Environment and Tourism.


LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

A Hunting Guide, Master Hunting Guide, or Professional Hunter with additional qualifications for bow hunting must guide trophy hunters visiting Namibia.
Bow hunting shall be conducted exclusively in the company of a registered hunting guide/ master hunting guide or professional hunter with an additional bow hunting qualification at all times in the bush or blind, and not more than two trophy hunters per guide at any given time. Bow-hunting may only take place on special game farms and areas which are registered for this purpose with the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. Respect Landowner’s rights Bow-hunting may only be conducted for the sake of trophy hunting.

Licenses/ hunt permits for various game species may be organized by the outfitter. MEFT licenses/ hunt permits must clearly stipulate Bowhunting at the top of the page.

No animal will be viable for inclusion in the NAPHA Top Ten List if said animals have been harvested with a permit not clearly displaying the Bowhunting stamp at the top of the page. The onus lies with the trophy hunter to check and ensure that the correct permits are in possession of the outfitter before hunting commences.

No person shall without the permission of the Cabinet hunt any game or other wild animal during the period from half an hour after sunset on any day to half an hour before sunrise on the following day.

The practice of shooting from a moving vehicle is prohibited; ethical principles of hunting determine that any animal must have at least an equal chance to escape. A hunting guest may only take two animals of a kind each year, irrespective of whether the trophies are exported or not.

All Trophies must attain the minimum points of trophy quality.
(Exceptions are allowed only with an old, setback, or very abnormal trophies.) 


Bow-hunting is guided by the Code of Conduct as set out below:

  • Hunting to take place on the principles of fair chase, as defined hereunder.
  • When bow-hunting, the hunter makes use of stalking as well as lying in ambush
  • Use of correct hunting methods and equipment to harvest animals in the least traumatic way possible
  • Bow-hunters should practice and train continuously to enhance their bowman ship.
  • They have to abide by the relevant laws, other legal requirements, and recognized codes of conduct.
  • They must actively enhance the survival of wildlife populations, protection of biodiversity, and the promotion of sustainable utilization.
  • Ensure humane practices in the utilization of wildlife.
  • Engage at all times in fair and honest, practices
  • Educate others regarding the benefits of sustainable use, conservation procedures, and the ethics of hunting.
  • Recognize indigenous rural community needs relating to sustainable natural resource utilization.

FAIR CHASE:
Every sport hunter should pursue an animal only by engaging in a fair chase of the quarry.

Fair chase is defined as the pursuit of a free-roaming animal or enclosed roaming animal possessed of the natural behavioral inclination to escape from the hunter and be fully free to do so.

  • Said animal is to be hunted without an artificial light source, not from a motorized mode of transportation.
  • No ethical hunter while sport hunting must take female animals with dependent young.
  • A sport-hunted animal should exist as a naturally interacting member of a sustainable wild population located in an area large enough for it to breed and forage or hunt freely.
  • Hunted animals should be sustained within a natural state of balance between forage, predators, and prey.

Trophies

A hunting guest may only take two animals of a kind each year, irrespective of whether the trophies are exported or not. All Trophies must attain the minimum points of trophy quality. (Exceptions are allowed only with old, setback, or very abnormal trophies.)

Minimum scoring total

Export of trophies

All trophies which are exported to the EU must be cleaned according to EU regulations. Hides need 14 days to dry.

Rifle Import Requirements

Hunters entering Namibia with a rifle(s), must complete a temporary import permit application form for all rifle(s) and/or ammunition in their possession. Download Temporary Import Permit application form The application form can be applied via e-mail (firearmairport@nampol.na) in advance to enable the Namibian Police Force to consider the applications and issue the permits on arrival.

Muzzleloader

“Smokepoles” and “Black magic”

The history of all shooting sports began with black powder and muzzleloaders. The man, or for that matter the nation responsible for the discovery of black powder has never been proved.

Muzzleloading firearms use either black powder or Pyrodex as the propellant. Smokeless powder CAN NOT be used as a substitute in muzzleloaders. Black powder has remained virtually unchanged for more than two centuries. It is a mixture of 75 parts potassium nitrate, 15 parts charcoal, and 10 parts sulfur. Pyrodex on the other hand is a 20th Century product, which offers black powder qualities without some of the black powder problems. Pyrodex fouls the bore less than black powder. However, it functions best when the bore has been properly dressed, meaning after 3 to 5 warm-up shots have been fired.

There are the modern “in-line” muzzleloading rifles that resemble contemporary centerfire rifles or there are the various traditional offhand rifles that are typical of those commonly available prior to 1840. A muzzleloading shotgun is capable of producing the same pattern and ballistics as a modern scattergun.

Increasingly more sportsmen are turning to black powder firearms as a way to expand their hunting opportunities and hone in on their hunting skills. Because of the muzzleloaders range limitations, sportsmen are finding black powder hunting to be a challenging test of their abilities. With the correct gun and load, practically any game can be taken by black powder. Hereunder are the basic guidelines and regulations to be followed when one plans to hunt with a muzzleloader in Namibia. But, before the sport begins, there are Do’s and Don’ts that MUST be taken into consideration when handling black powder and a muzzleloader 

STORAGE:

PERMITS AND TRANSPORTATION:
The transportation of black powder by private individuals without a valid permit is illegal and EXTREMELY DANGEROUS. Black powder is highly flammable! Prior to a client departing for their hunting destination, the professional hunter who will be guiding him/her, must, on their behalf apply for an ACQUISITION, CONVEYANCE, AND STORAGE OF GUNPOWDER PERMIT. The permit will be made available within 24hrs of the application to the Office of the Chief Inspector of Explosives and will be valid for the period stipulated in the permit.

The following information must appear on the application form, which can be obtained from a gun dealer or the NAPHA Office:

  • Name and address of the professional hunter as well as that of the client.
  • The quantity of black powder that the client wishes to purchase.
  • This is NOT to exceed 1kg.
  • The make and the serial number of the firearm.
  • Arrival and departure dates.
  • A copy of the professional hunter’s identity document.
  • A copy of the clients passport and a copy of the firearm license.

Storage:

The black powder is to either be stored in a lockable safe or steel cabinet. Black powder can be stored in conjunction with other propellants. The container is to be tightly sealed so as to avoid the black powder from becoming moist. Due to the volatility of black powder, extreme caution must be taken to avoid contamination thereof.

AVAILABILITY and DISPOSAL OF BLACK POWDER IN NAMIBIA:

We regret to inform you that at present there is no black powder available in Namibia, but please watch this site for further updates. 

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM – REGULATIONS REGARDING HUNTING WITH A MUZZLELOADER:

The Ministry of Environment and Tourism (M.E.T) under the Nature Conservation Ordinance 1975: No.4 of 1975 in the section Restrictions in regard to firearms and capturing apparatus:

42. (1) No person shall use a revolver, pistol or automatic fire-arm when hunting game or use a firearm of which the bullet has an energy at the muzzle of the barrel which is lower than the following when hunting the species of game indicated there under:

a. 5400 joules Buffalo
b. 2700 joules: Eland, Kudu, Oryx, Wildebeest, Hartebeest, All species of exotic game.
c. 1350 joules: Springbok, Duiker

This section prescribes a minimum muzzle velocity that is allowed for certain species of game. Heavier calibers with higher muzzle velocities may be used.

Bow Hunting

Bow Hunting in Namibia

Namibia has a long tradition of hunting with a bow and arrow. Practiced by various rural communities; the most well-known of these is the Kalahari Bushmen, who traditionally hunts with poisoned arrows. Bow-hunting for trophies in its modern form was legalized during 1997 and is thus a recent development.

The predominant drive behind this development was the ever-growing trophy hunting sector. Modern-day trophy hunters, who would like to hunt in Namibia with a bow, can select from a large variety of registered Bow-hunting outfitters. Due to Namibia’s natural habitat, types of game and seasonal changes in vegetation, bow hunting requires the highest standard of hunting skills and ethical behavior.

EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Long Bow – being a straight, one piece or take down bow 
  • Recurve Bow – being a bow with curved tipped limbs which bend away from the archer when the bow is held in the shooting position
  • Compound Bow – being a bow which uses a cable and pulleys to increase its power or the velocity of the arrow shot from it, by means of the storing of energy
  • Cross Bow – Illegal in Namibia

HUNTING TECHNIQUES:
Bow-hunting in Namibia is practiced using a number of techniques. Hunters may lie in ambush in areas frequented by game, or they may stalk their prey.

BLINDS:
Bow hunting from blinds is preferred during the Namibian winter months, June until August and the drier months September and October. The majority of hunting takes place from permanently constructed blinds i.e. ground blinds, tree blinds and temporary pop-up blinds on game trails. Animals have to be within 20 m -30 m from waterholes and salt lick stations, relaxed and unaware of the hunter. Normally only “side-on” shots are taken.

SPOT AND STALKING:
This method is preferred during the green season months, February until May as sufficient cover exists and the green bush is softer on the foot and reduces noise while stalking. Spot and stalk hunting is also used for the “more difficult” game species or those that do not frequent waterholes. Due to the difficulty of achieving the above criteria, bow-hunting in Namibia is technically a highly selective sport and requires above normal self-discipline and physical fitness. Surrounding game species are disturbed very little and are often not even aware of the hunt that is taking place.

ARROWS:

Arrows can be made out of

  • Wood, fiberglass, carbon or carbon compounds and aluminum  
  • The shaft must have a minimum length of 19.68 inches (500 mm)

BROADHEADS:

Broadheads must

  • Consist of at least two fixed cutting blades   
  • A minimum cutting edge length and width of 1 inch (26 mm+)

Broadheads may not

  • Have barbed or serrated edges
  • Contain poison or narcotics

Mechanical broadheads are legal in Namibia. Special arrow points such as judo points, bird points or blunt points may be used for the bow hunting of game bird species only, a hunter may take no more than two members of the permitted bird species during the hunt, which will be listed in the trophy permit.

PLAINS GAME:

Namibia offers a large variety of plains game species for trophy hunting. These include the following with the minimum Bow energy restrictions:

Small game
Rock-rabbit (hyrax), Rabbits, Porcupine, African Wildcat, Caracal, Black-backed Jackal, Damara Dik-Dik, Steenbok, Duiker, Klipspringer, Springbok, Letchwe, Blesbok, Bontebok, Bushbuck and huntable game birds.
Energy less than 33.9 joules (25ft/lbs)
Weight less than 22.68 gram (350 grain)

Medium game
Chakma Baboon, Warthog, Black-face and Southern Impala, Nyala, Spotted Hyena and Cheetah
Energy less than 54.24 joules (40 ft/lbs)
Weight less than 25.92 grams (400 grain)

Large game
Gemsbok/ Oryx, Kudu, Red Hartebeest, Roan antelope, Sable antelope, Tsessebe, Waterbuck, Blue and Black Wildebeest, Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra and Burchell’s plains Zebra, Cape Eland and Giraffe.
Energy less than 88.13 joules (65 ft/lbs)
Weight less than 29.16 gram (450 grain)

DANGEROUS GAME:

The following Dangerous Game species CANNOT be hunted in Namibia with the Bow:

Elephant, Hippopotamus, Crocodile, Buffalo, Lion, Leopard

It is illegal to hunt any of the above-mentioned Dangerous Game species with the bow and export the trophy on a Special (Rifle) permit from MEFT, Ministry of Environment and Tourism.

Legal Requirements

A Hunting Guide, Master Hunting Guide, or Professional Hunter with additional qualifications for bow hunting must guide trophy hunters visiting Namibia.
Bow hunting shall be conducted exclusively in the company of a registered hunting guide/ master hunting guide or professional hunter with an additional bow hunting qualification at all times in the bush or blind, and not more than two trophy hunters per guide at any given time. Bow-hunting may only take place on special game farms and areas which are registered for this purpose with the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. Respect Landowner’s rights Bow-hunting may only be conducted for the sake of trophy hunting.

Licenses/ hunt permits for various game species may be organized by the outfitter.MEFT licenses/ hunt permits must clearly stipulate Bowhunting at the top of the page.

No animal will be viable for inclusion in the NAPHA Top Ten List if said animals have been harvested with a permit not clearly displaying the Bowhunting stamp at the top of the page. The onus lies with the trophy hunter to check and ensure that the correct permits are in possession of the outfitter before hunting commences.

No person shall without the permission of the Cabinet hunt any game or other wild animal during the period from half an hour after sunset on any day to half an hour before sunrise on the following day.

The practice of shooting from a moving vehicle is prohibited; ethical principles of hunting determine that any animal must have at least an equal chance to escape. A hunting guest may only take two animals of a kind each year, irrespective if the trophies are exported or not.

All Trophies must attain the minimum points of trophy quality.
(Exceptions are allowed only with old, setback, or very abnormal trophies.)


Bow-hunting is guided by the Code of Conduct as set out below:

  • Hunting to take place on the principles of fair chase, as defined hereunder.
  • When bow-hunting, the hunter makes use of stalking as well as lying in ambush
  • Use of correct hunting methods and equipment to harvest animals in the least traumatic way possible
  • Bow-hunters should practice and train continuously to enhance their bowman ship.
  • They have to abide by the relevant laws, other legal requirements, and recognized codes of conduct.
  • They must actively enhance the survival of wildlife populations, protection of biodiversity, and the promotion of sustainable utilization.
  • Ensure humane practices in the utilization of wildlife.
  • Engage at all times in fair and honest, practices
  • Educate others regarding the benefits of sustainable use, conservation procedures, and the ethics of hunting.
  • Recognize indigenous rural community needs relating to sustainable natural resource utilization.

FAIR CHASE:

Every sport hunter should pursue an animal only by engaging in a fair chase of the quarry.

Fair chase is defined as the pursuit of a free-roaming animal or enclosed roaming animal possessed of the natural behavioral inclination to escape from the hunter and be fully free to do so.

  • Said animal is to be hunted without an artificial light source, not from a motorized mode of transportation.
  • No ethical hunter while sport hunting must take female animals with dependent young.
  • A sport-hunted animal should exist as a naturally interacting member of a sustainable wild population located in an area large enough for it to breed and forage or hunt freely.
  • Hunted animals should be sustained within a natural state of balance between forage, predators, and prey.

The above definition may be modified by the regional hunting associations based on legal, customary, and necessary circumstances which may be unique to each country or area.

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